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NVIDIA CUDA video editing application round up Print E-mail
Written by Hanners   
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 01:00
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NVIDIA CUDA video editing application round up
Test setup, Badaboom&heading=NVIDIA CUDA video editing applications
Loiloscope&heading=Loiloscope
Nero Move It&heading=Nero Move It
MediaShow Espresso&heading=MediaShow Espresso
vReveal, TMPGenc&heading=vReveal, TMPGenc
PowerDirector 7, TotalMedia Theatre 3&heading=PowerDirector 7, TotalMedia Theatre 3
Conclusions&heading=Conclusions

NVIDIA CUDA video editing application round up

GPU computing has been a buzz phrase for what seems like so many years now it somehow doesn't feel like a concept that should be new and exciting, yet even half-way through 2009 using your graphics board to do something other than 3D rendering or video decoding for playback is still an oddly unusual experience.  Although we've afforded some coverage to both GPU physics (via NVIDIA's PhysX technology) and a couple of applications that make use of graphics processing power for video editing and transcoding, we haven't really had an in-depth look at how the general purpose GPU ecosystem is stacking up these days.

With Windows 7 just around the corner, bringing with it DirectX 11 and most likely the wider uptake of applications that make use of a modern GPUs processing power (including within Windows 7 itself), now seems like as good a time as any to appraise some of the applications currently available on the market which make use of this power.  As virtually all of these applications for the average user focus on working with video in some way, shape or form, thus our round up here will also set its sights on video editing and transcoding as the major talking point of this article.

As AMD's Stream technology is still in its infancy in terms of actual software support, we'll also be keeping our focus strictly upon applications which make use of NVIDIA's CUDA technology, employing a GeForce GTX 260 part to see just what a reasonably powerful GPU can do for the various video-related tasks we'll be laying out here compared to a high-end Intel Core i7 CPU.  So, without further ado, let's start making our way through the sea of CUDA-capable applications we have before us.



 
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